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Full text of "The Tattler"

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FOREWORD 



The class of 1953 of Williamsburg High 
School has joined the ranks of the Alumni. On 
these pages are recorded the events occurring 
at Burgy High during our last, most important 
year of High School. Again this year, as last, 
"The Tattler 11 has been scheduled for fall publi- 
cation in order that we may include the Junior 
Prom, the complete baseball schedule, and, most 
important, photos of Class Night and Graduation. 
By the time that the yearbook goes on sale, we 
eighteen 1953 graduates will be established in a 
new kind of life. Thus far our lives have been 
almost completely prearranged for us. From 
now on, however, we will be largely on our own, 
the draft excepted. 

If the graduates of the 1890's could have fore- 
seen the events, discoveries and inventions 
which were to transform the country and every- 
one's way of living within sixty years, they 
probably would have shaken their heads in dis- 
belief. How could they even have dreamt of ra- 
dio, television, airplanes, x-rays, atomic power, 
modern miracles of medicine, and the thousands 
of other marvels almost beyond comprehension? 

When we try to imagine the wonders which 
may transpire within our lifetimes we realize 
that there is virtually no limit to where the fu- 
ture may lead us. Ours will be an era of oppor- 
tunity and discovery. But no matter what world 
changing events may befall, we will always look 
back on our few short days at "Good Old Burgy 
High" and the classmates, teachers and friends 
whom we knew there, and say, "We wouldn't have 
missed it for a trip to the moon." 

Good luck to our futures, everyone! 

F. A. S. 








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Joan Patricia Culver 

"Pat" 
"Nothing is so difficult 
but that it may be found out by seeking." 
President 4; Vice President Secretary 1; Or- 
chestra l,2,3,4;Glee Club 2,3,4; Chorus 1,2,3,4; 
Basketball 1,2,3,4; Cheerleading 1,2,3; Forensic 
1,2,3; Tattler Staff 2,3,4; Prom Committee 3; 
Christmas Dance 3; Play 3,4; Minstrel 4; Fresh- 
man Reception 4. 



Mary Jane Curtis 

"Janie" 
"I've taken my fun where I've found it." 
Treasurer 4; Chorus 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 2,3,4; 
Tattler Staff 3,4; Prom Committee 3; Christmas 
Dance 3; Forensic 2; Freshmen Reception 4; 
Minstrel Show 4; Pro Merito 4; D. A. R. Good 
Citizen 4; Play 4. 





Barbara Ann Derouin 

"Bobbi" 
"I agree with no man's opinion. I have some of 



my own 



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Chorus 1; Cheerleader 2,3,4; Freshman Recep- 
tion 4; Play Committee 4; Christmas Party 
Committee 3. 



Patricia Inez Evans 

"Pat" 
"Enough work to do and strength enough to doit." 
Chorus 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 3; Christmas Party 3; 
Prom Committee 3; Class Play Committee 4; 
Freshman Reception 4. 





Richard Augustus Ferreira 

"Farouk" 
"Nothing is so dear and precious as time." 
Treasurer 3; Play 3; Chorus 3,4; Glee Club 3,4; 
Freshman Reception 4. 



Mary Esther Graves 

"Machine Gun" 
"Manner, not gold, is a woman's best adorn- 
ment." 
Basketball 1,2,3,4; School Paper 2; Chorus 1; 
Glee Club 3; Junior Christmas Party 3; Junior 
Prom 3; Tattler Staff 3,4; Play 3,4; Minstrel 4; 
Freshman Reception Committee 4. 





Charles David Heath 

"Dave" 
"He has the art of telling you. nothing in a great 

harangue." 
Orchestra 1,2,3; Glee Club l;Chorus 1,2; Prom 
Committee 3; Tattler Staff 3; Christmas Dance 
3; Freshman Reception 4; Minstrel 4; Class Play 
4. 



James John Johnson 

"Jimmy" 
"Calm of mind, diligent of purpose." 
Chorus 1; Basketball 1,2,3,4; School Paper 2; 
Christmas Dance Committee 3; Junior Prom 
Committee 3; Pro Merito 3,4; Freshman Re- 
ception 4; Tattler 4; Class Play 4. 





Julia Clara Kolosewicz 

"Dolly" 
"What a time! What a civilization." 
Class Secretary 4; Glee Club 1,2,3,4; Chorus 1, 
2,3,4; Freshman Reception Committee 4; Prom 
Committee 3; Tattler Staff 3,4; Class Play 4; 
Christmas Party Committee 3; Minstrel 4. 



Sidney Alfred Nichols 

"Sid" 
"What is worth doing is worth doing well." 
Treasurer 1; Pro Merito 3,4; Tattler Staff 4; 
Junior Prom 3; Freshman Reception 4; Christ- 
mas Dance 3; Minstrel 4; Class Play 4. 





Nancy Ann Outhuse 

"Nance" 
"Life has a value only when it has 
something valuable as its object." 

Vice President 1,4; Girls Basketball 1,2,3,4; 

Glee Club 2,3,4; Chorus 1,2,3,4; Minstrel 4; 

Class Play 4; Christmas Dance 3; Freshman 

Reception 4; Cheerleader 2,3; Junior Prom 3; 

Tattler 3,4. 



Walter Richard Pierce 

"Dickie Bird" 

"He hath no leisure who useth it not." 

Treasurer 2; Baseball 2; Prom Committee 2,3; 

Freshman Reception 4; Christmas Dance 3; 

Class Play Committee 4. 





Richard William Purrington 

"Dickie" 
"People who make no noise are dangerous." 
Chorus 3,4; Glee Club 4; Junior Christmas Party 
3; Junior Prom 3; Freshman Reception 4; Sen- 
ior Play 3,4; Basketball Mgr. 3,4; Minstrel 4; 
Forensic 2. 



Raymond Milton Rice 

"Ray" 
"Be useful where thou livest." 
Chorus 3,4; Glee Club 3,4; Orchestra 4; Christ- 
mas Dance 3; Junior Prom Comm. 3; Play 
Comm. 4; Minstrel 4. 





Karyl Ronka 

"Karyl" 
"Do you not know I am a woman? When I think, 

I must speak." 
Historian 2,3; Chorus 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 4; Tat- 
tler 4; Girls' Basketball 1; Prom Comm. 3; 
Freshman Reception 4; Christmas Dance 3; 
Minstrel 4; Junior Prom Comm. 3; Forensic 1, 
2. 



10 



Ramon Russell Sears 

"Ray" 

"A little nonsense now and then is relished by 

the best of men." 
Historian 1; Treasurer 2; Class President 3; 
Chorus 2,3,4; Tattler Staff 4; Glee Club 4; 
Freshman Reception Comm. 4; Jr. PromComm. 
3; Christmas Dance 3; Baseball 1,2,3,4; Basket- 
ball 1,2,3,4; Boys' State 3; Pro Merito 3. 





Frank Austin Smith 

"Homer" 
"It is not enough to do good; one must do it the 

right way." 
Class President 1,2; Class Sec'y.3; Class His- 
torian 4; Good Government Day Rep. 4; Boys' 
State 3; Glee Club 3,4; Chorus 1,3,4; Baseball 
2,3,4; Basketball 1,2,3,4; Pro Merito 3,4; School 
paper 1,2; Tattler Staff 3,4; Minstrel Show 4; 
Christmas Dance 3; Class Play 4; Junior Prom 
3; Freshman Reception 4. 



Jean Tiley 

"Tinky" 
"Those about her from her shall read the per- 
fect ways of honor." 
Secretary 2; Chorus 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 2,3,4; 
Prom Committee 3; Christmas Dance 3; Fresh- 
man Reception 4; Girls' State 3; Tattler Staff 4; 
Play 4; Minstrel 4; Basketball 4. 





11 




CLASS 





When a student comes to his Senior year in high school, he is so glad 
to think that at last he is through school, that it doesn't seem as though he 
has actually been here for four years, and has done the many things that 
he participated in during these years. 

It seems as though it were only yesterday when 23 new students- -some 
painfully shy, others brassy show-offs, but all terribly self-conscious and 
slightly bewildered --bunched up in small tight little knots. From the cor- 
ners of our eyes, we looked each other over, nervously awaiting the bell 
which would send all the students hurtling up the stairs; all, that is, except 
the brand-new, green Freshmen- -us- -who waited until those worldly- 
wise, experienced, upperclassmen had passed, giving each of us a coldly 
appraising eye as they rushed by. 

Assigned to Room 6, we had Mrs. Grinnell for our home-room teacher. 
Several days after Fall term opened, we had our first- -the quietest- -in a 
series of many class meetings, and elected the officers who would theoret- 
ically guide us through the first harrowing year. Of course the treasurer 
had an extra hard job, since it was up to him to collect and keep a record 
of all the money that came in from all the students in class dues, and by 
the end of the year, the phenomenal sum of $2.00 had been collected. 

Our first year in high school was made more confusing by an affair 
planned for our "entertainment", by the Seniors. The evening of Fresh- 
man's Reception finally arrived, and we were tried by a jury of leering 
Seniors. Each of the terribly self-conscious Freshman was accused of some 
dastardly deed, such as being too shy, chewing gum, or going home for 
lunch; and regardless of degree of innocence, he was proclaimed guilty by 
the impartial jury, and given a sentence suitable to the "crime" com- 
mitted. For those students who had been tried first, the evening was a 
fairly pleasant one, but for those who had not yet been tried and sentenced 
as the evening wore slowly on, the affair was a rather unpleasant and dis- 
tasteful one, to say the least. And when the time for refreshments had rolled 
around, we certainly were in no mood for punch and cupcakes. 

In our Sophomore year, we spent much time doing nothing, although 
we did rather half-heartedly attempt to plan a card party to earn revenue. 
But this plan died before it could be born, and we faced our Junior year in 
a practically penniless state. In that year, Mr. Edward "Doc" Foster, our 
hoom-room teacher, passed away, and his position was filled by Mr. Ger- 
ald Ritter. 

Our Junior year was altogether different from the preceding two, how- 
ever. During that period, we spent a hectic, but thoroughly enjoyable year 
in Mr. Branch's room, planning a Junior-Senior Prom, A Christmas Party, 
selling coke and chips at basketball games, and one or two food sales. Our 
Prom was the first to be held in the Grange Hall, and was a highly success- 
ful affair, with Dick Duda's orchestra furnishing the music and choosing the 
queen and her court. In fact, this dance was not only a success from the 
fact that all had a good time, but also from the financial stand -point — 
we actually made 550 on the deal to feed our starving treasury. 

In spite of all these vigorous activities, it appears that we just weren't 
ambitious enough as a class, and ended the year with only $66 in our 
emaciated treasury, whereas previous classes as a rule had at least a couple 
hundred dollars to start them out right in their last year at school. 

At last we were Seniors, with Miss Nancy Carson as our long-suffering 
home-room teacher. And since our treasury was in a sad state indeed, we 
had to get right on the ball to collect enough money for the class gift, 
and salt away a sum large enough to take us to New York City during 
Spring Vacation. 



12 



HISTORY 



Finally it was our turn to wreak vengeance for the humiliation caused 
us by the Seniors four years ago, on the new crop of loud- mouthed Fresh- 
men. And this we did in grand style! We pitchfork wielding Seniors held 
court around a boiling cauldron in a miniature Hell, with the Freshmen 
groveling at our feet as we meted out fitting punishment. A dance, fol- 
lowing the initiation, was more of a success than was expected, and al- 
most everyone had fun. 

The first activity which was undertaken by the slightly depleted class 
of 19, was a food sale, which, as it turned out, was one of the most suc- 
cessful food sales in many years, netting about $150. 

In October, we started rehearsals for a minstrel show which was held in 
the Grange Hall, November 5. There was a lot of unnecessary horsing 
around during the "meetings" and after them, as we all well remember, 
but everyone had fun and the show was a success, which rather surprised 
the cast and all the rest who were connected with the great production. 
No one knew why certain jokes were disapproved of so highly that we were 
strongly "urged" to change them for the one-night stand in Haydenville, 
and it still remains a mystery to us all! 

As soon as the Minstrel was over, the Senior Play came to the fore, and 
the problem of choosing a play which was suitable to available talent be- 
came readily apparent. We finally decided upon "The Angell Brats," a 
play by Jay Tobias. It took some doing, but Mr. Leo Parent was finally 
prevailed upon to direct the play. Rehearsals were a constant source of 
consternation to Miss Carson and Miss Dunphy, who rather early in the game 
lost confidence in us, and were rather dubious about the play being any 
kind of success when it was finally put on the stage. Which just goes to 
prove that teachers are not always right, because the play was a resound- 
ing success with a full house both nights! This play was produced by the 
same talented cast, in Chesterfield, and the jokes were received with 
great enthusiasm by those hilltown farmers! 

At last came the day to which we had looked forward, and earned and 
saved for. The morning of April 19 saw us in Springfield Station, an event 
whichhadkeptusup in the air for many weeks, planning. We had listened 
to four different classes of Seniors relate their New York experiences, and 
longed for the day when we could say to each other, "Remember the night 
in New York that So-and-So did such-and-such? Wasn't that a scream? 
..." and would have the satisfaction of knowing something that the other 
kids didn't, but wish they did. 

During our stay in Big Town with our extremely co-operative chaper- 
ones, Nancy and David West, we saw all the things which high school 
groups usually see — and more besides! Although we ran them ragged 
with our antics, and used the hotel telephone extension more than was 
strictly necessary, the staff at the Hotel Taft was courteous, and humored 
us during our four-day stay. There were pictures, of course, some of which 
can be seen in the "Tattler." 

All through the year we had worked hard and made money like mad, 
and when the time for the class trip arrived, we had $600, approximately, 
which was the usual sum when compared with the Senior Class treasuries 
of past years; and after the trip, we had about $40 left with which to buy 
our class gift, a lectern for Room 6. 

As a class, we were very picnic and party minded.- — None of us will 
soon forget the picnics at the D.A.R. Reservation in Goshen, the hayrides, 
the parties we had, or the time that most of this Senior Class took off on 
a balmy day in September for the Eastern States Exposition in Springfield, 
at 9:00 A.M. and stayed until late evening. These were the things which 
made our stay here much more enjoyable, and must rightly take a promi- 
nent place in the list of events which make up the history of the Class of 
1953. 




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16 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Constance Packard, Jane Beals, Robert Bisbee, Ellen Jane Ames, 
Helen Sroczyk. SECOND ROW: Norman Stone, Yvonne DuFresne, Sondra Black, Nancy Brewer, 
Lucy Mathers, William Hayden. THIRD ROW: Mary Smart, Anne Ice, Anthony Soltys, Janice 
Richardson, Barbara Cumm. 



In September it was back to the old grind of studies, home- 
work, and exams. As Juniors we felt superior to the Freshmen 
and Sophomores, but it was soon forgotten as we began work in 
earnest. 

With our class officers elected as follows: Robert Bisbee, 
president; Jane Beals, vice-president; Connie Packard, secre- 
tary; Ellen Jane Ames, treasurer; Helen Sroczyk, historian, we 
looked forward to a busy and prosperous year as Juniors. 

Our class was well represented in most of the organizations. 
Everyone participated in at least one of the following: basket- 
ball, cheerleading, chorus, glee club, orchestra, and Pro Merito. 

To raise money we planned a food sale and later a card party. 
The Christmas Dance and the Junior-Senior Prom both added to 
the fun. 

As our Junior year comes to an end, we are anticipating our 
activities as Seniors next year. 



18 




SOPHOMORES 



<o* 





FIRST ROW, left to right: Janet Vayda, Beverly Richardson, Paul Harlow, Alison Sharpe, Linda Sander- 
son. SECOND ROW: Nancy Curtis, Bruce Peavey, Richard Braman, Rolfe Bryant, James Evans, John Dy- 
merski, Donna Shumway. THIRD ROW: Marilyn Pearl, Jacquelyn Morin, Alice Nugent, Larry Sherk, 
Dorothy Hillenbrand, Mary Baker. 



The Class of '55 came back to Williamsburg High School feeling proud 
for now we were Sophomores. Having become better acquainted with 
each other and our abilities we chose our class officers carefully. Paul 
Harlow was elected president; Alison Sharpe, vice-president; Beverly- 
Richardson, secretary; Janet Vayda, treasurer; and Linda Sanderson, 
our historian. 

Our class was well represented in the boys' and girls' athletic teams, 
glee club, chorus, and orchestra. Some of us were elected to important 
posts on next year's "Tattler" staff. We were proud to be part of a school 
with such fine athletic teams under the expert coaching of Mr. Tonet. 

We are looking forward to our last two years of high school, with the 
hope that we will get as much enjoyment as we have during the first two 
years. 



19 




First row, left to right: James Morin, Diane Besner, Robert Clark, Raymond Heath, Alan Sullivan, Nan- 
cy Muraski, Eleanor Baldwin, Ann Sullivan. Second row: Barbara Kellogg, Charlotte Hillenbrand, El- 
dora Read, Evelyn Warner, Leona Shumway, Margaret Johndrow, Patricia Gorham, Janet Higgins. Third 
row: John Hayden, James Hayes, Joan Braman, Jo Ann Dostie, Gloria Baker, Robert Healy, Russell Le- 
onard. Fourth row: Mandy Smith, Francis Leamy, Eugene Kolosewicz, Joseph Moynahan, Russell Ban- 
croft, Clark Bernier, Robert Morton, Philip Bowie. (Absent: M. Carter, Carol Wailing.) 




FRESHMEN 



As Freshmen, the class of '56, with thirty-two 
students, is probably one of the largest classes to 
enter this high school. The class of '56 is some- 
what of a problem to the faculty as they are having 
trouble finding a room large enough to hold us next 
year. 

We were all very nervous the first day not 
knowing what to do or where to go, but we soon be- 
came accustomed to the high school schedule. 

The Freshman class has been prominent inboth 
boys' and girls' sports. Many of us have also been 
active in chorus and glee club. 

With our firstyear of high school behind us, we 
look forward to becoming the Sophomore class. 




20 




SEATED, left to right: Joan Culver, John Merritt, Philip Bowie, Son- 
dra Black, Alice Hathaway, Betty Sherk. SECOND ROW, standing: 
Larry Sherk, James Morin, Jackie Rice, Raymond Rice, Lida Sherk, 
Ronald Packard, Richard Bryant. 



fc>' ! 



o 

R 
C 
H 
E 
S 
T 
R 
A 





STANDING, left to right: James Johnson, Sidney Nichols, Norman 
Stone, Mary Jane Curtis, Helen Sroczyk, Frank Smith. SEATED: Miss 
Anne T. Dunphv. 



P 

R 

O 

M 

E 

R 

I 

T 

O 




22 



G 
L 
E 
E 

C 
L 
U 
B 




FIRST ROW, left to right: Ramon Sears, Larry Sherk, Janet Higgins, Patricia Gorham, Mary Smart, 
James Morin. SECOND ROW: Raymond Rice, Richard Ferreira, Dorothy Hillenbrand, 'Gloria Baker, Julia 
Koloszycz, Evelyn Warner, Nancy Outhtise, Donna Shumway, Leona Shumway, Nancy Brewer, Mary Jane 
Curtis, James Hayes, James Healy, Russell Bancroft. THIRD ROW: Charlotte Hillenbrand, Barbara 
Cumm, Jacqueline Morin, Karyl Ronka, Jean Tiley, Janet Vayda, Janice Richardson, Ellen Jane Ames, 
Connie Packard, Jane Beals, Frank Smith, Richard Purrington. SEATED: Joan Culver. 



s inging , 
Glee Club 




For those who enjoy 
Monday morning spells 
practice. 

At a public concert May 14th by 
the various music groups in the 
school the Glee Club offered three 
songs "Silver Fish" by Wickham, 
"Nightfall in Granada" by Bueno, and 
"Royal Minuet" by Beethoven. These 
songs were also sung at an audition 
at the Western Massachusetts Music 
Festival in Turners Falls, May 18th. 

The Glee Club's contribution to 
Class Night exercises were "Down 
in the Valley" a Kentucky Mountain 
folk song, and "Royal Minuet." At 
Graduation they sang "Nightfall in 
Granada," and "Silver Fish 




ti 




MISS OLIVE A. HEALY 

Miss Healy, who is well known in Western 
Massachusetts music circles has directed 
music activities in the Williamsburg schools 
for the past twelve years. 



23 




ARTISTS 



Standing left to right: Julia Kolosewicz, Karyl Ronka, 
Richard Purrington, Ramon Sears, Miss Nancy Carson, 
Anthony Soltys, Joan Culver, James Johnson, Nancy 
Outhuse, Sidney Nichols, Mary Jane Curtis, Jean Tiley, 
Constance Packard, Mrs. Frances Grinnell, Seated: 
Frank Smith, Mary Graves. 







EDITOR AND ASSISTANT EDITOR 



BUSINESS MANAGERS 



24 





"Lesson one: This is not a basketball! " 



"That's how not to drive, Clark! 



IT'S ALL IN A DAY'S WORK 




"Don't watch your fingers, Mrs. Grinnell." 



"You've got me stumped, Johnson." 
"Wow! that story was a doozy! " 



"Quiet, pee-pull!" 
"This one 's a gift ! " 





'Don't gnash your teeth--it can't fight back! 



I 

N 
F 

O 
R 
M 
A 
L 
S 




"Help thy neighbor." 



"This is a lunch room?' 



Mr. Bisbee — "Don't ask 
me, ask Miss Dunphy." 





Front Row, 1. to r. --Mary Baker, Ellen Jane Ames, Mary Smart. Back Row, 1. to r. --Nancy 
Muraski, Linda Sanderson, Jacquelyn Morin. 




CHEERLEADERS <# 




Led by our cheerleaders, 
those who followed our bas- 
ketball teams this year dem- 
onstrated more spirit and en- 
thusiasm than ever before. 

Decked out in their new 
uniforms the girls cut a sharp 
figure both on the home court 
and away. 

Since none of the girls will 
be lost by graduation, we all 
look forward to one of the best 
drilled cheering squads in the 
area to come from Burgy 
High. 



28 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM 

First row seated, 1. to r.: Donna Shumway, Nancy Outhuse, Joan Cul- 
ver, Mary Graves, Jane Beals, Leona Shumway. Second row: Coach 
Evelyn Kmit, Connie Packard, Nancy Curtis, Sondra Black, Evelyn 
Warner, Ann Sullivan, Jean Tiley. Third row: Alison Sharpe, Diane 
Besner, Jo Ann Dostie. 



As seen below, our girls 1 bas- 
ketball team had an outstanding '52- 
'53 season. Under the leadership of 
Mrs. Kmit, who was always encour- 
aging and enthusiastic, our season 
ended with one of the best records in 
the history of W. H. S. Through the 
speed of our guards, two of whom we 
lose through graduation, the oppo- 
nents score was kept low. The for- 
wards chalked up a total of 500 
points, of which Mary Graves, also 
a senior, scored 199 points. 

The climax of the season was the 
Testimonial Banquet. The three 
seniors, Joan Culver, Nancy Out- 
huse, and Mary Graves, received 
trophies, and the remainder of the 
team, plus the manager and time- 
keeper, received white sweaters 
with green emblems inscribed with 
the school letters in an original de- 
sign by Nancy Outhuse. 



Games 

Smith School 

Charlemont 

Powers 

Northfield 

Smith School 

Huntington 

Hopkins 

Smith School 

Sanderson 

Hopkins 

Northfield 

Smith Academy 

Powers 

Charlemont 

Sanderson 



Opp. 


Burgy 


10 


36 


11 


21 


33 


16 


17 


26 


13 


43 


25 


40 


29 


39 


8 


27 


15 


20 


11 


22 


26 


30 


31 


20 


20 


28 


27 


45 


26 


17 



29 




BOYS BASKETBALL TEAM 



FIRST ROW, left to right: Ronald Packard, Paul Harlow. SECOND 
ROW: John Dymerski, James Johnson, Ramon Sears, Frank Smith, Joseph 
Moynahan, Robert Clark. THIRD ROW: Richard Purrington, Raymond 
Heath, Rolfe Bryant, Eugene Kolosewicz, Coach Earl Tonet. 



Coach Earl Tonet had a success- 
ful 1952-1953 basketball season, with 
the "Frosty Kids" winning 12 out of 
16 games . 

To show how close they came in 
their defeats, the Green Dragons lost 
their four games with a total of 
twelve markers. One of our losses 
was a tight game against Sanderson 
Academy, which was lost by a close 
score of 38-36, but they, as well as 
Sanderson, received one leg of a 
three leg permanent trophy. 

Williamsburg broke two records 
this year. They scored 843 points to 
top the previous record of 742 tal- 
lies, and had the best season's rec- 
ord, with 12 and 4. 

Although the team loses three 
first-string players through gradu- 
ation, those boys coming into high 
school in the fall, and those who are 
now underclassmen, show much 
promise, and will comprise our fu- 
ture winning teams. 




Name 



pos 



F.G. F.T. T.P. A.P.G. M.P. 



Moynahan -c- 


16 


95 


66 


256 


16 460 


Sears -rf- 


16 


56 


47 


159 


10 430 


Smith -rg- 


16 


46 


31 


123 


10.3 471 


Clark -lf- 


12 


50 


23 


123 


7.69 167 


Dymerski -lg- 


16 


34 


23 


91 


5.7 429 


Johnson -lf- 


16 


23 


9 


55 


3.4 269 


Heath -u- 


11 


6 


5 


17 


1.5 66 


Packard -u- 


11 


4 





8 


.85 40 


Harlow -u- 


10 


3 


1 


7 


.72 33 


Bryant -u- 


7 


3 





6 


.70 44 


Kolosewicz -u- 


9 


1 



Opp. 


2 


.22 20 
Burgy 


Smith School 






21 




61 


Alumni 






31 




49 


Charlemont 






30 




59 


Powers 






32 




58 


Northfield 






32 




56 


Huntington 






56 




52 


Chicopee Trade 






30 




46 


Williston J. V. 






50 




48 


Sanderson 






49 




59 


Clarke School 






40 




61 


Northfield 






20 




53 


Williston J. V. 






46 




42 


Powers 






21 




54 


Charlemont 






39 




60 


Clarke School 






38 




53 


Sanderson 






38 
573 




3£ 

847 


°jo for year 52.5 


°!o for 


year 35.8 



30 



Med 



*c«iamc 



from V.ii- downed 



tturgy Victim 

The Williamsburg High team 



Jast nif 




Again rormee. 



League "Which Via* Start 



Aiuniiu rive 



haydkxvil: 

I 



fifth 111 ti< 



ed in '80s I?, Reorganized feated the I 

vith Five Teams. ^ il 
liamshnrsr in F 



e opening minutes of the 
. game as each shot of Charted - 
mont went in it was nullified bym m 



ilhamshurg j Blll ,„ hers In 
Drops r irst 



tington Defeats Frofty 

ids with Lh«I Half 




6th Victory Burgy Alone 

In lop Spot 



Trims Sanderson in Frank 
lin League Game. (,i,-h 
AI-o Win ' on i 



et's hoj .-• 
<t dciwm-I 



5iir«j:> Girls 




Burgy Maids 



op Hopk 

gh School 

of th 

- - - i ■ ' 



trghers Top 
larlemont 5, 
ear Pennant 



uri»hers Are lief ea ted, 
lose Giance For Title, 
Girls' Team Also Los< 




Burgry Maids 



HAYDE 

liamsburg 

I tucked aw 

I ball win 1 

i won over t 

- in a one-si 

- Burgy gir 

ol gir 
half, when 



try Gv 
'did a trem 
! fense as sh< 
,i her team. 




in a Franklin i ■ 

[irs 
, Moj 
the lii 
hrow n 



till SCOI I'll. ,\j 

cd ■in .1 mm 
inson then I 

for this round 



n was a'so doi 





\f 





Left to right: Mr. Tonet, Mr. Murphy, Mr. Branch, Miss Dunphey, Mrs. Kmit, 
Mr. Merritt. 



TESTIMONIAL BANQUET 



The third annual banquet to honor the boys' and 
girls' basketball team was held April 13 at the Wil- 
liamsburg Congregational Church, with Mr. Robert 
Branch as master of ceremonies. Following a turkey 
dinner and a greeting by Miss Dunphey, Coach Earl 
Tonet presented green sweaters to all the boys except 
the three seniors, who received white ones. Coach 
Evelyn Kmit awarded trophies to the three senior girls 
and white fleece jackets to the rest of the squad. Re- 
marks for the teams were made by Joan Culver and 
Frank Smith. Gifts from the teams were presented to 
the coaches by Connie Packard and Ramon Sears. The 
speaker of the evening was Postmaster John Murphy 
of Northampton, whose subject was 1! The Importance 
of Sports to Today's Youth". We sincerely appreciate 
the efforts of the citizens' committee who made it pos- 
sible for this banquet to be a pleasurable memory for 
all of us. 




"Job well done, Joe.' 



"I wonder if it could 
possibly be a . . .?" 



32 




Burgy Opens Burgners Trip Burghers Top ij ur o| lors Win. Burghers Wiu 
On Diamond charlemon^' *<>rthfie!d 9 Lead League Number Four 



Rally for Kim in Ninth l<> 
Cop I ranklin It 
Opener. PIa> Nortnfield 
Friday 




irke S<liool and Owrlc- 
noiii Next t <rr» for Wil- 
ianu>burg Nine. Clark 



Trim >milh"t Nl 
hind Clark. Pla> 
son On I rida\ 




I 



enet 

rase 

aik.< 



11 



: : 



I'll -• 

i er 

mer 



Burgy Loses Burghers Lose Clark Tosses Burgy Topped, Belchertown 



,.J 



First Contest Second In Row One Hit Game Ties In Loop Tops Burgy 



HAY) 



scored 





Burgv Club 
Wins Title 



X3~ -f<sw«Arl I*? 



Don 
ners i 
and a 
single; 

runs. ' 






"*%» 



RW 





Beats Cliarlemont 10 To 


0, 




Shares Title With San- 




derson 






i 


g* 






tic 




i 


lin 




i 






.. ir aj^^^^fc. 


rtU 




MMb mk >H^ 


tor 


the ha 




»m 




jeji Kfeh^_^3^H Hb 




double . 










mi 




liigBB HI .■■■k^W^^ ,^^^m 





iurgy iota I. 
Robert Clark iirr+»«< 



33 



B 
A 

S 
E 
B 
A 
L 
L 




r u j 




1st Row, L. to R. -- Ray Heath, Paul Harlow, Frank Smith, Ramon Sears, Bob Healy, Russell Leon- 
ard. 2nd Row--Coach Earl Tonet.Joe Moynahan, Malcolm Heath, Ronny Packard, Gordon Beebe. 
3rd Row--John Dymerski, Richard Braman, Jim Morin. Absent—Bob Clark. 



Our 1953 baseball team, comprised of two seniors, two 
sophomores, seven freshmen and three boys from the 
grammar school, was probably one of the youngest teams 
ever to represent Burgy High. Nevertheless, after strug- 
gling through a cold, muddy, two weeks of pre-season 
practice, they proceeded to win their first four games in 
a row. The spell was finally broken by a Clarke School 
team which made the most of its opportunities to win by 
a close score of 5-4. 

BobClark, a southpaw, carried the load in the pitching 
department, ending the season with seven wins and only 
two losses. Joe Moynahan was our hard luck pitcher, los- 
ing his only two decisions by scores of 5-4 and 6-3. Ray 
Sears drew the praise of everyone for the way he handled 
the catching department. 

In baseball, as in basketball, Burgy was forced to share 
the Franklin League crown with Sanderson Academy of 
Ashfield when we lost at Ashfield, 9-4, in one of our more 



poorly played games. Both teams finished with a 5-1 re- 
cord in League play. 

Our overall record of 7 wins and 4 losses is one for fu- 
ture teams to shoot for, and judging from the material on 
hand, it shouldn't be long before it is topped. 

WHS - 3 2 - Charlemont High - - 10 H • 

WHS - 7 2 - Northfield High - - 8 H • 

WHS - 6 1 - Smith School - 9 H 

WHS - 9 6 - Sanderson Academy - 9 H • 

WHS - 4 5 - Clarke School - 7 H 

WHS - 1 - Belchertown High - 2 H 

WHS - 3 6 - Chicopee Trade - 3 H 

WHS - 5 4 - Northfield High - 8 H • 

WHS - 5 6 - Belchertown High - 4 H 

WHS - 4 9 - Sanderson Academy - 7 H • 

WHS - 10 - Charlemont High - 6 H • 

•Franklin League Games 





Pos. 


G. 


AB 


R 


H 


E 


2B 


RBI 


SB 


BB 


PCT. 


1. 


Harlow - RF-Lf 


11 


33 


10 


8 


1 


1 


3 


2 


14 


.242 


2. 


Braman - CF 


11 


34 


6 


6 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


.176 


3. 


Clark - P-l 


11 


33 


7 


11 


3 


1 


3 


2 


6 


.333 


4. 


Moynahan - SS-P 


11 


28 


9 


13 


6 


2 


4 


9 


8 


.464 


5. 


Sears - C 


11 


31 


6 


9 


4 


- 


5 


2 


4 


.290 


6. 


Healy - LF-RF 


10 


26 


3 


6 


- 


1 


2 


1 


7 


.231 


7. 


Smith - 3-SS 


11 


38 


6 


9 


6 


1 


5 


5 


1 


.237 


8. 


Dymerski - 2 


10 


24 


3 


4 


3 


2 


5 


3 


5 


.167 


9. 


R. Heath - 1 


11 


24 


3 


2 


6 


- 


2 


- 


2 


.086 


10. 


Leonard - 2 


4 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


.000 


11. 


Morin - RF 


2 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.000 


12. 


G. Beebe - RF-2 


2 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.000 


13. 


M. Heath - LF-RF 


2 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.000 


14. 


Packard - 2 


4 


3 


1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


.333 



34 




.uvtu«ft* e 



bot^e 



•Y\vW 





" 'A 







M 




R 
E 

C 
E 
P 

T 
I 

O 
N 




"Off, like a herd of purple 
turtles! " 

MINSTREL SHOW 




"I can handle this job all by my- 
self?" 




"Man, dig those cra--zy eyes! " 
"Hope you liked our show?" 



V 





4 fa 'f 



^sweer,:^ 




Uve i t 



up. •• 




•^V'" 








The Cast 



"THE ANGELL BRATS 



•>"> 



a comedy in three acts 



Play by Jay Tobias 



Directed by Leo Parent 



The Cast 



(In older of appearance) 

Hydrangea Iodine Jimpson, the Negro cook 
Epidemic Apocolypse Peters, her "finance" 
Ruth Alden, the Angell's door-mat 
Dr. Wylie Angell, a professor of zoology 
Patricia Angell, Wylie's eldest daughter 
Venetia Van Arlen, an actress 
Dorothy Angell — "Dodo," Wylie's youngest 
Billy Angell, Wylie's harum-scarum son 
Grandma Grimes, the Angell's grandmother 
Azarias Peabody, Wylie's rich uncle 
Orley Van Arlen, Pat's lisping admirer 
Winnie Oliphant, a perfume saleswoman 
Don Daggett, a college freshman 
Twila Twitchell, a children's librarian 



Julia Kolosewicz 

Frank Smith 

Nancy Outhuse 

David Heath 

Joan Culver 

Karyl Ronka 

Janice Richardson 

Russell Leonard 

Jean Tiley 

Richard Purrington 

Sidney Nichols 

Mary Jane Curtis 

James Johnson 

Mary Graves 



STAGING STAFF FOR "THE ANGELL BRATS" 



Faculty Advisor 

Stage Manager 

Properties 

Tickets 

Make-up 

Lighting 

IHiblicity 

Prompters 

Concessions 



Miss Nancy Carson 

Ramon Sears 

Richard Pierce, Ramon Sears 

Richard Purrington 

Mr. Eugene Titus 

Richard Purrington 

Raymond Rice 

Jane Beals, Helen Sroczyk 

Patricia Evans 





"You black coughdrop!" 




'The horned toad- 




"I'm your thlave, thweet. 




"How da ya like my cigaroot, Vaneeshy?" 



37 







J* 




ro/tl 



une 



h '953 




38 



THE SENIORS SEE NEW YORK 



NEWS FROM NEW YORK 
Pierce: "Ha Ha Ha" 

Purrington: "Oh God the Subway at 5 P. M." 
Heath: "I don't remember!" 
Outhuse: "Let's go again!" 
Tiley: "Oooh La La" 

Ronka: "Don't they ever roll up the sidewalks?" 
Ferreira: "It was good while it lasted." 
Johnson: "What a dead town at 7 A. M." 
Nichols: "No dull times." 

Rice: "That's one place where my Ford doesn't belong ! " 
Sears: "The place to go for a hot time, but oh! the after 

effects from it all!" 
Kolosewicz: "I refuse to commit myself!" 
Culver: "And I didn't even get to ride on a subway! ! !" 

Curtis: "Come on Sears, where shall we eat? ! ? 

Smith: "Even the sun doesn't hit the streets until noon." 
Graves: "Gee, but Woolworth's is a practical store--and 

big, too ! " 
The Wests: "Has anyone seen seventeen seniors from 

Burgy High School?" 




"Anyone seen my husband?' 





It won't be long, boys! " 



Burgy gets up in the world--70 stories. 





Jean, where's your hat??! 



"And where have you all been?' 



39 




'Yoo hoo -- Taxi' 




Nancy O: "Hot to take off for E. 
St. L." 





" t -.•■ ' 



Let's see -- we came up 46th 




"No Officer, just resting" 





"Den da copper says ta dis blonde 
dish ." 




"Pawdonme, has anyone seen my 
husband?" 




"Dear Ray- 



"Who got up so early?' 



'Home Sweet Home' 



CONTRIBUTORS TO "THE TATTLER" 



\*ra 



Mr avu4 Mrs. vJosepW ~B«V 
fAr. aMcA Mrs Q>sjyra€. ->TudA 
Mr ay\d (Ur^. £r dr \ "ToAi\" 

Mr. awA Mrs. T^-tA 6r'wv\<dSl, 
f\Ar. UloacX U) ■accW'ejr 

MlS»s N&rtc^ Ccxrs^A 
Mr. awJl fltas. (UerjUl "B'vsW 



>££_ 



Mr. omA Mrs LvXt'vos |V^£rc\*fc. 
M.r. aM<dt Mrs. f^olo^rA ©x-?waV\ 
Mr. \ve*wv**tv. UJVieJU*-' 
X^r. <v+A Mrs. G. F" O&\ocnwv 
$V A. UeaJ^ 

CJUs* o-S 19 Sip 

Mr /V\. C. Ss^dU^ 




Class Jft^t ^Exercises 



Processional 
Address of Welcome 



Joan Culver 



President Class of '53 



Class History 

Music — Down in the Valley 

Class Prophecy 
Prophecy on Prophetess 
Music — The Royal Minuet 



Karyl Ron\a 

Kentucky Fol\ Song 
Glee Club 

Mary Jane Curtis 

Ramon Sears 

Beethoven 
Glee Club 



Class Will K[ancy Outhuse 

Class Grinds Jean Tiley, Richard Ferreira " 

» 

Presentation of Class Gift Joan Culver 

Acceptance of Class Gift Robert Bisbee 

President Class of '54 

Recessional 

Wednesday at 8 o'clock 
June 17, 1953 






42 



GRINDS 



BOYS 



GIRLS 



In our class are nine young men, 
And each of them a perfect gem. 
As I tell you about them, one by one, 
Remember folks, it's just in fun! 

Raymond Rice just loves his car, 
And "flies" o'er hills both near and far. 
He does our errands without a fret, 
Smiling and good natured you can bet. 

Dick Purrington is one of those boys 
Who likes to make a lot of noise. 
But loads of fun he really is, 
And at taking pictures is a whiz. 

Now Ramon Sears is a male, 

Who has to have his ginger ale! 

On baseball diamond or basketball court, 

He helps the score and is a swell sport. 

When-e'er in class there is a lull, 
And things are getting rather dull, 
Who saves the day with his ready wit? 
David Heath soon has us all in a fit! 

Someone's asleep beside his books, 
It's Dick Ferreira by the looks. 
He's a wolf--so some folks say, 
But from our door don't stay away! 

In mathematics he rates so high 
Perhaps another Einstein by and by! 
'Tis Sidney Nichols of whom I speak 
Who in his shorts did make us shriek. 

Dating a different girl each night- 
This is Dick Pierce's chief delight. 
He's really in a merry whirl, 
Checking the time, the place, the girl. 

He "hitched his wagon to a star"- 
As scholar and athlete has gone far. 
Frank Smith's only warning card came 
From a state cop, enroute to a game! 

With Nichols and Smith he makes the "big three' 
Whose report cards never have rated a "C" 
(I wish they'd tell me how it's done) 
You guessed it- -James Johnson is the one. 

I'll say adieu, my part is o'er 
But Dick Ferreira will tell you more. 
About the girls, he must recite- 
I wonder what will be our plight! 

Jean Tiley 



Now we come to the girls' grinds, 
To put on each a tag that binds. 
Rhyming them was pretty tough- - 
So don't blame us if the going's rough. 

Patty Culver is our first cutie-- 
And as we know, she's quite a beauty. 
Very active in every affair; 
She also attracts many a stare. 

Very quiet and very reserved, 
Pat Evans is also nicely curved. 
And since this is no mean trait-- 
It's no wonder she always has a date. 

Most stylish of dress, but often absent- - 

Bobby Derouin is heard to comment; 

"Mrs. Grinnell is a great friend of mine. 

But everytime I see her, she sends a tingle up my spine. 

So round, so firm, so fully packed- - 
By Jean Tiley, I'm liable to get smacked. 
Still, after sporting those trousers, 
A wit we'd hate to lose is hers. 

A good friend of Jean's I'd like to introduce, 
But as you have guessed it's Nancy Outhuse. 
Nancy has proven a talented artist, 
And in the play a capable dramatist. 

The one most full of vitality 

Is Karyl Ronka its plain to see. 

When it comes to English, Karyl's no slouch, 

But math's her weak point, as Branch will vouch. 

Julia Kolosewicz is the clever actress, 
And played her part with keen finesse. 
She also likes to draw a great deal, 
And this she does with no lack of zeal. 

Next on my list is Mary Jane Curtis, 
Ample of body with nothing amiss-- 
Despite this there's charm in her manner; 
And for her good grades we all wave a banner. 

Last but not least we have Mary Graves 
And undoubtedly you all know how she behaves. 
But although she's inclined to be somewhat wild, 
With Ray she will someday go down the aisle. 

Among these girls there wasn't a lemon, 
So without any rinds I'm quite out of grinds 
I thank you fine people for listening so intently, 
As for your patience, you all have shown plenty. 

Richard Ferreira 



43 



CLASS PROPHECY 



The odor of ether permeated the operating room as I took off the gauze mask and turned on the ventilator. Open- 
ing the door I wheeled the patient down the long corridor and into a semi -private room. A glance at the progress 
chart told me that the patient had been admitted the day before and that she would be here for at least two weeks. I 
was very much interested in this particular case because it happened to be one of my old classmates -- Karyl Ronka. 
I waited for her to come out of the anesthesia and after what seemed an eternity her eyes finally opened. I imagine 
that it was quite a surprise to her to see me after so many years. 

The next few days as Karyl became stronger we talked often about what had become of our classmates. I learned 
that she had tired of teaching biology and had looked for a job that was different and exciting. She had found what 
she wanted in her present work training crocodiles for circus shows. She liked the job very much until the other day 
when one of her pets had decided to have some of her leg for lunch. She had come to the hospital for transfusions 
and skin grafting. Karyl told me that the latest group of her trained crocodiles had been used in a special show called 
"Ferreira's Flea Follies." I asked her if by chance it was our old friend Dick and to my amazement it was Richard 
himself who ran the show. He had trained some fleas to lift weights and had expanded his menagerie until now he had 
a complete circus. This show, which traveled all over the country was also quite famous for its spectacular fat lady, 
who was none other than Barbara Derouin. I simply couldn't believe this but Karyl explained that shortly after we 
graduated Barbara had written a book entitled "How to Write the Perfect Excuse." This famous volume had become 
as popularwith the teen-agers as Johnnie Ray had been in 1952. Bobbie had collected millions from royalties and had 
everything her heart desired. Strangely enough she had become so bored with life that she had started eating and had 
rapidly gained until she now weighed 614 pounds. Ferreira had hired her for his show when he heard about this. Even 
though I knew that Karyl had never gossiped in high school days, it was hard to believe her. 

One day as we were talking Joan Culver came from down stairs to see Karyl. It didn't take long for the three of us 
to start on old times at the Snack Bar. When Karyl asked Joan what she did she explained her job telling her that she 
sorted lungs in the Lung Dispensary. The ones that were from dying people who were willing to donate them were 
transferred to other patients who needed new lungs. Joan is quite intrigued with her unusual business. Just then a bell, 
announcing lunch rang, and we said good-bye to Karyl. 

About four o'clock that afternoon a voice called to me from the loud-speaker asking me to come to the office. A 
new patient was being admitted and it was none other than Sidney Nichols. It seems that after finishing the course in 
the Forestry Department of the University Sid had gone to Africa as a conservation official. While working on an ir- 
rigation project to water the Sahara Desert and plant it to maple trees he had suffered a sunstroke. He had then been 
sent home for a check up and a visit. I soon got to talking with him and he told me that he had met James Johnson 
while he was in Africa. Jimmy was big-game hunting over there and he also collected alligator teeth. Because the 
alligator has thirty or forty sets of teeth in a lifetime Jimmy'scollection would fill the White House. I asked Sid where 
Jim got the money to finance trips like this and he told me of Jim's invention that cut time in production at the Hay- 
denville Button Shop. He had made considerable money from this and had retired from Haydenville society. 

He next told of seeing Mary Graves in India where she has a full-time job cleaning and polishing the marble of the 
Taj-Mahal. After working all day Mary teaches the children of Agra the fundamentals of basketball. Now this really 
surprised me -- I never thought Mary would get that far from home. 

Later that evening I went up to Sid's room to show him an article in a magazine about Jean Tiley. The story started 
from her childhood days, even including life at Burgy High, and continued to the present to cover her rise to the posi- 
tion of foremost woman jockey in the world. Jean had won 11 Derby races and countless others at Lincoln Downes and 
Saratoga. The article was full of praise and I was proud of Jean. Besides this big job she is national president of the 
Pilgrim Fellowship which has always been a love of Jean's. Sidney was pleased that Jean had carried on with her fel- 
lowship work too. As visiting hours were starting I had to leave Sid so I said good-bye to him because he was going 
home in the morning. 

Not too long after I had seen Sid, I was relaxing in my house on Mountain Boulevard one evening when there was a 
knock at my door. My visitor proved to be Julia Kolosewicz and I was so surprised to see her that I was speechless, but 
not for long. She told me about being ship-wrecked on an island in the South Pacific where she had learned to cook 
native dishes. These dishes were unique concoctions which turned a person's hair any color depending on the ingredi- 
ents. Julia had patented the idea immediately when she arrived back in this country, and the money was beginning 
to pile up from this. I thought to myself that it certainly is strange how artistic impulses find a channel. Julia had 
been very interested in art while in school and her flair for color had found an opening after all. 

Later over our coffee she told me about Nancy Outhuse who was living in St. Louis where she drew bill-board de- 
signs for the Bubble of Bubbles Gum Company. She has a nice family of ten and her husband teaches in the University 
School of Aeronautical Technology. Nancy is also taking a refresher course in French so Julia told me. 

Realizing that Julia hadn't been in this area long enough to have heard of Ramon Sears I proceeded to tell her about 
his beingchosen Father of the Year for 1970. She had trouble even imagining that he was a father but when I told her 
of his sextuplet sons she really gasped for breath. I went on to tell her of the old homestead and the new road passing 
by the boys' home, and also all the traffic that comes and goes by the house. I emphasized that Mr. Tonet had been 
the first visitor to see the boys for during high school days he had pointed out that Lithia was too small to be on the 
map, but at last something had been done about it. 

Next we discussed Frank Smith's occupation. He has a position in a North Carolina cigarette factory. He cakes just 
so many puffs from each cigarette and tests them for the perfect smoke, which we hope he finds some day. After all 
the fuss Frank made about the "people who smoke and make me choke" this is a surprise career for Frankie. 

Just then the radio in the kitchen happened to catch our attention as the announcer said that Raymond Rice was the 
winner of a world famous auto race, Ray had won in the midget Hudson. Everyone will remember the practice Ray 
got for his chosen career around Burgy in his younger days. Anyway, it's something to use your hobby for a way to make 
a living. Julia then realized that the news broadcast had been the 12 o'clock news so she said good-night and started 
for home in her convertible. 

Some time later that month I waswalking downMain Street in 'Hampwhen I met Richard Pierce. Dick told me he 
was in Sing Sing but I couldn't figure how he could be if he was walking on the streets of Massachusetts. He explained 
that he was the rehabilitation director for the prison. After the Navy stint was over he had gotten his degree at college 
and had landed this job. 



He mentioned meeting Patricia Evans on a train in California which was taking her to San Francisco to a ship which 
was taking her to Thailand. She was bookkeeper for a tin magnate and then decided to stay out there and write short 
stories. Dick said that at present she was working on a novel based on her English Class with Miss Carson as the chief 
"character." 

Dick had also seen Dick Purrington in Reno where the old boy was getting a divorce from his sixth wife. Richard 
was a hair-stylist and had a list of wives almost as long as Henry the VIII. This didn't surprise me because I knew that 
Dickie had always liked the girls but it did seem that he was lightly over doing it. I wondered if there would be a 
seventh one. 

Last but not least, Dick told me about David Heath. I would be up to date on the whole class when I hear the latest 
about Dave. I urged Dick to hurry up and tell me the news about David's doings. He told me that Dave was campaign- 
ing for governor of Kentucky and that he went around playing his guitar and patting little children on the head. He 
played for country dances and weddings and his campaign was turning out most successfully. Later that week I read 
in the paper that Heathie had been elected. So David had become a politician -- now I had heard everything! But I 
also remembered that Dave had always been quite a talker even in class when he wasn't supposed to be saying a thing! 
So I suppose that with all his convincing speeches and his really fine music he had overwhelmed the mountaineers and 
carried their votes away. 

Next day as I was walking down the corridor to the operating room I thought that same thing that every Burgy gradu- 
ate thinks at some time or another -- "There never was a class quite like ours." 

Mary Jane Curtis 



PROPHECY ON THE PROPHETESS 

The year is 1970 and all the newest inventions and contraptions are just out. Jet cars are a common sight now, 
tearing up the road and leaving nothing and we are getting along well with the Martians. The Korean war is still 
waging between the U. N. troops and Russia's big Red army. There is not much difference in Korea now as compared 
with 1953 except the peninsula of Korea is slowly disintegrating into the sea, and every atomic and hydrogen blast 
keeps knocking off a little more until even the earth is becoming lopsided. Truce talks with the Russians are at last 
improving, we have now gotten back all our PW's from 1953. And back in my little home town, Burgy, the school 
building question is still coming up. A few generous donaters were kind enough to contribute towards two glass class 
rooms on the roof of the "sad and now broken-down looking school building. But let's leave this world situation for 
awhile and get back to Canada where I am fishing. 

Itwas here, yesterday, in the same spot I am now that I met an old classmate for the first time in a score of years. 
Yesterday an atomic powered water craft came cruising down the river at a very good knot-per-hour clip and finally 
creamed into the dock right beside me. The skipper, a lady of many occupations, as I found out later, and her 
Canadian crew had just finished a Sunday morning fishing trip. Before I could move, her bellowing voice that shook 
the boat ordered me to get the H off her property. I had been accidentally trespassing on her land and so I went over 
to apologize to her. It wasn't until then that I recognized Mary Jane Curtis! ! 

After a very hearty greeting from her and many pleasing recollections of the past, she asked me if I would come 
with her to her carnival business operated by her and her husband. I said yes, and she said she would drive us over in 
her car. 

"Pile in," she ordered, "Don't you recognize the old Chevy any more?" 

I had failed to recognize one of the best known and fastest cars around Burgy in 1953. It was almost a junk now 
and pretty well beat up from banging around every state in the Union plus Canada. 

"Wouldn't you rather ride in my jet propelled car?" I offered. 

"No thanks," she replied, "The day my car can't keep up with these modern-day ones I will sell it to an antique 
shop." 

Riding along and glancing at the speedometer I saw the needle edge up to the 90-mile an hour mark. 

"Nice roads up this way," she remarked, "I wonder what ever gave them the idea of making them out of rubber?" 

"I don't know," I said, "Smoother ride I guess, By the way, the old motor still hits 90 I see, but you better watch 
it, the speed limit is 85." 

"What's 5 miles an hour more?" she cracked. 

Just then a blue streak pulled past us blowing its siren. "Pull over lady," a large loudspeaker informed, "You're 
going too fast. We clocked you on the radar screen." 

Strangely enough Mary Jane wasn't worried at all for she had been stopped many times since the Florence cops had 
warned her, and she had built up a very good friendship with the blue boys. 

After things were straightened out I asked, "Don't you run out of money paying all these fines?" 

"No," she replied, "My carnival business nets me enough to take care of that." And I soon found out why. 

At the carnival she led me into a tent with words overhead reading -- MADAME JANE CURTIS -- FORTUNE 
TELLER. I knew she had done a good job on our class prophecy, but I didn't think she had taken it that seriously and 
become a fortune teller just because we all turned out to be just what she had predicted. 

Just then a tribe of kids came running in. "Catch any fish today Mommy?", they inquired. 

Surprised, I asked, "Are these all yours?" 

"Sure," she announced proudly, "And I'm going to teach them all to be entertainers in the carnival business just 
like me." 

After introducing me to her baker's dozen she took me around to the rest of the show, showing me all the stands 
that she worked at, including the sword swallower's, fat lady's, and fire eater's. No wonder she had made such a suc- 
cess and so much green stuff. 

Finally after our long and friendly reunion, it was time for me to leave that wonderful show girl and entertainer. 

"Where is the carnival going next?" I asked. 

"We hope to set up in Burgy for a couple of weeks," she replied, "Right on the Helen E. James school grounds." 

Ramon Sears 

45 



Z\)t (Class of 

1953 

Williamsburg ?jial} #'cl)ool 

requests thr honor of ljour presence 
at the 

Commencement Exercises 

Ih^irsban lEhtninrt, Jnnt IS, 1953 at 8 o'clock 
Jficlcrt ~£. panics Scliool ituilbinp. 





(intimation %xtxtize$ 



Processional 



Invocation 



|}ragrgm 



Reverend Henry F. McKeon 



Oration — The Growth of Education in America James Johnson 



Music — Nightfall in Granada 



Bueno 



Glee Club 



Oration — Civil Rights — Is This Nothing to You? Sidney Nichols 



Music — The Silver Fish 



Glee Club 



Oration — The Farm Dilemma 



Awarding of Prizes 



Presentation of Diplomas 



* America (first and last verses) 



Benediction 



Recessional 



♦After 
Benedi 



Wic\ham 



Frank Smith 

Anne T. Dunphy 
Principal 

Warren E. McAvoy 
Chairman of School Board 



Reverend Charles F. Crist 





(Pass Jtoll 



\\S" 






"A' 



««/ 




Cluij uiha fto tlnu lu-st i>o Mil. 
Iliis IL'rrtifu-s (Thai Xicltard "U'illiam IVm-riiy tan /-,. 

rtwAfy/rtf //n itttr '/'.//-> >< it r ,* </ J»t/u 
, r ,,,t/.,/ , ; //. 'ttt/h .///</ (m/ /, / n/i//,,/ /, /A ti 

Diploma 

Jin Ulitm-ss {@ hereof, ». 4am .i//,.<rJ ,«, njnaikm 
„/ l! ■//,„„, ./„,., / ... ,/;, y ffyLuH*. /9)3 



t 



Joan Patricia Culver 

*Mary Jane Curtis 

Barbara Ann Derouin 

Patricia Inez Evans 

Richard Augustus Ferreira 

Mary Esther Graves 

Charles David Heath 

**James John. Johnson 

Julia Clara Kolosewics 

** High Honor 
* Honor 



**Sidney Alfred Nichols 
Nancy Ann Outhuse 
Walter Richard Pierce 
Richard William Purrington 
Raymond Milton Rice 
Karyl Ronka 
Ramon Russell Sears 

**Frank Austin Smith 
Jean Tiley 



CLASS OFFICERS 

President — Joan Culver 

Vice President — Nancy Outhuse 

Secretary — Julia Kolosewics 

Treasurer — Mary Jane Curtis 

Historian — Frank Smith 

Class Motto — "He Who Does His Best Does Well" 






CLASS WILL 



We, the class of 1953. being of unsound "mind and body, do hereby proclaim this to be our last will and testament. 
Since we are leaving Williamsburg High School, we bequeath our most precious possessions to the following: 

SECTION I 
Article 1 To the teachers we leave our gratitude for having tried to teach us something in the past four years. 
Article 2 To Miss Dunphy we leave the question of what really happened on our New York trip. 
Article 3 To Mr. Merritt we leave Williamsburg High School. 
Article 4 Dick Ferreira leaves his job at the Pro-phy-lac-tic to Mr. Branch so that he can get first hand information 

on the labor unions. 
Article 5 To Mrs. Grinnell we leave a hen and a package of carrot seeds so she can grow her own lunches. 
Article 6 To Mr. Wheeler we leave just a little bit of "pull" in the office. 
Article 7 To Mr. Tonet we leave the penalty of staying 20 minutes for every 5 minutes he skips in the afternoon in 

order to attend baseball games. 
Article 8 To Miss Carson we leave a pogo stick so she can dodge the erasers and spitballs in English Class. 



Article 


1 


Article 


2 


Article 


3 


Article 


4 


Article 


5 


Article 


6 


Article 


7 


Article 


8 


Article 


9 


Article 


10 


Article 


11 


Article 


12 


Article 


13 


Article 


14 


Article 


15 


Article 


16 


Article 


17 



SECTION II 
Sidney Nichols leaves his brains to be used as the first brick for the new school. 
Ray Sears leaves a supply of sulfur to be used to initiate the new English teacher. 

Frank Smith leaves his car radio to anyone who can work it, and his stripped gears to Alison Sharpe, if she 
thinks she can strip them further. 

Dick Purrington leaves his ad-Jibbing ability to anyone who will enjoy it as much as he did. 
Ray Rice leaves all his love letters to anyone who likes good literature. 
Dick Pierce leaves his way with the girls to Norman Stone who will be ever grateful. 
Jimmy Johnson leaves the notes which he intercepted, to the people for whom they were intended. 
Dave Heath leaves his way with the teachers to anyone who dares to accept them. 
Mary Graves leaves a glass of water to Bobby Bisbee for use in New York. 

Mary Jane Curtis leaves her driving license to the Northampton Police Dept. if they can catch her to get 
it. 

Karyl Ronka leaves Central Park to her sister for future use. 
Barbara Derouin just leaves. 

Pat Evans leaves her ability to keep quiet, to Jackie Morin, who, she is sure, can use it. 
Jean Tiley leaves her hat to the man who stole it off her head in the New York Subway. 
Nancy Outhuse leaves her French book to anyone who is crazy enough to take French II. 
Julia Kolosewicz leaves a muffler to Larry Sherk to be used in study halls. 
Joan Culver leaves her frequent accidents on the basketball floor to Diane Besner. 



SECTION III 
Article 1 To Mr. Bisbee, we leave one robot, female, to be a mate to the one he was left last year, so she can 

sweep the floor in Room 1 for him. 
Article 2 To you, the townspeople, we leave the courage to face the complaints that your children are going to bring 

home because they are still not yet equipped with adequate facilities; and we leave you the incentive 

needed to build a building. 
Executed on this seventeenth day of June in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and fifty-three. We do 
hereby subscribe our names. 



Witnessed by, 
Mortimer 
The Crown, and 
A Pale Green Passion Flower. 



48 




*7&e S*uac£ ^>at 



8 Main St. 



Luncheonette - Fountain 
Home Made Pies 

Tel. 4101 



Williamsburg 



?TMJ* 




\/ns wor /i.-.cmc:/ f 



!EU?PiP™ 



=3 1 H 



i in 



M 



si 



■=C\cKr»JUI 



A. W. Borawski 



Insurors and Realtors 



Tel. 254 



56 Main Street 



Northampton 



R 



me 



CL 




Ri 



A 



TmounceTnerus 



t 



Y« 



booK 



e^TDOOIAS 



Award 




Since I8T7 



Representative : 



Ed Cull en 

PO. Box IH-G8 
Opr'mgfielcl, I lass. 



ANTIQUES 

General Line of Small Antiques 
Old Glass - China — Tin - Iron — Buttons 

Hemlock Hill West Chesterfield 
Massachusetts 

Gene Titus — Open May 15 


CENTRAL TAXI - "3700" 

Northampton, Massachusetts 
Tel. 3700 


C F. JENKINS 

ICE CREAM - STATIONERY 
GREETING CARDS - MEDICINES 


WOODWARD & HODGKINS 

"If its insurance, see us." 

Tel. 998 
39 Main St. Northampton, Massachusetts 


Compliments of 

MURPHY DETECTIVE AGENCY, 
INC. 

245 Main Street 
Northampton, Massachusetts 


KARL'S 

Power Mowers & Engines 
Sales — Service 

Phone 4088 
50 Fruit St. Northampton, Mass. 


NORTHAMPTON RADIATOR CO 
INC. 

Welding — Painting 
"Radiator Repairing a Specialty" 

Reasonable Rates 

Phone 2204 W 
Northampton Mass. 


LANE LOOMS 

Rollo Purrington 

39 Main Street 
Haydenville Mass. 



HEALY BROTHERS 

Dealers in: 

Esso Gasoline & Oil 

Rural Gas Service 

Auto Repair 

Best Wishes to the 
CLASS OF 1953 


Compliments of 

TAXI 55 

Northampton Mass. 


Compliments of 

WALTER SALVO 

Realtor 

Draper Building 
171 Main Street Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone 621 


Compliments of 

CHRISTENSON 

Paint & Wallpaper Supply 
Florence Mass. 


Hemcienway Real Estate Agency 

JEAN E. HEMENWAY fAffi WILLIAMSBURG, MASS. 

FARMS HOMES BUSINESSES 

Williamsburg Tel. 3621 



PIONEER VALLEY STAMP 
CO. 

Rubber Stamps — Marking Devices 
Printing Plates and Supplies 



67 Ryan Road 



Florence, Mass. 



"Our line is everything in the 
marking line" 

Telephone Northampton 482-W 



Household Qooi 




WALTER'S 
APPLIANCES & FURNITURE 

DISTRIBUTOR DF BOTTLE GAS 
Phone Northampton 396B 



Walter strycharz 

PBO PS ETC R 



2C6 RUSSELL STREET 

HADLEY, mass. 



WILLIAMS HOUSE 

Fine Food & Choice Beverages 
Sandwiches — Snacks 
Parties and Banquets 



Phone Williamsburg 511 



Robeson and Hester Bailey 



CLIFTON L. SEARS 

Piano Studios 
Teacher of Popular and Classical Music 



Tel. 4391 



Cummington, Worthington and Chesterfield 
Chair Re-Seating — All Types 

Hand Woven Reed Baskets 
Magazine Subscription Service 



Cummington, Mass. 



Edward H. Cotton 



Karl R. Uhlig 



HAMPSHIRE TREE cV LANDSCAPE SERVICE 



"A Complete Service" 



Depot Avenue 
Florence, Mass. 



PHONE 3549 



Best Wishes 



to 



CLASS OF '53 



from 



CLASS OF 54 



Compliments of 



DAILY HAMPSHIRE GAZETTE 



DIDONNA CLEANERS AND 
DYERS 

QUALITY CLEANING 



Tel. 323 
79 Hawley Street Northampton, Mass. 









DR. 0. T. DEWHURST 
OPTOMETRIST 



Tel. 184-W 



201 Main Street 



Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 
P. Ahearn Co. 



2 Pomeroy Terr. 
Northampton 



64 Main Street 
Florence 



GAZETTE PRINTING COMPANY, INC 



Established 1786 



From a card to a book' 



Phone 1097 
15 Armory Street Northampton, Mass. 



Co?fip&ffi£*ejZd/ Oj£/ 




^(KgAa*n4>fr*v. < 7 ftcL4g/ . 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



THE H4YDEWILLE C0MPAJ1Y 




•Ale Cc&2iur& 



150-154 Main Street 
42 Green Street 



Northampton 
Massachusetts 










To Cover ALL Your Bleeds 

KING I C US H MAN, Inc. 

259 Main Street 
Northampton Telephone 610 



\< 



& 



tS^ort 






^cAiir^ 



*> 



{ft 



UU 



QtmpJ!imjL>nJtd/ oE 



Chesterfield, Mass. 



Pizzitola Music Studios 

"The School of Achievement" 

AcCOMKW- GuflAR & REIATIVB iNSTRUliENTS 

Instumemts To Loan To Beginn ebs 
Tel 2t50 142 Nam 5t. 

Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 


GAGNON AND FORSANDER 




Depot Avenue Florence, Mass. 


ANN AUGUST & CO. 


Telephone 819 Northampton 


Northampton Mass. 


KAISER- FRAZER 




Sales and Service 


Compliments of 


HATHAWAY £ CULVER LUMBER 


Tel. 219 Williamsburg, Mass. 


Again in '53 Ford is the Favorite of 
Students Across the Country. 


Diamonds Watches 


"The New Standard of the American Road" 


Silverware Jewelry 


New and Used Cars and Trucks 
A-l Automotive Service and Repair 


M. J. KITTREDGE, INC. 




Tel. 338 


BLYDA MOTOR SALES, INC. 




TEL. 2400 
171 KING ST. NORTHAMPTON 


146 Main Street Northampton, Mass. 



5^?* &™*%^$/a3s 


fluting jDvttoK 

S FUNERAL SERVICE / 

114 KING STREET . NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 


"All Seniors who fail to graduate in 1953 

are cordially invited to join the 

Class of 1954." 


J. W. BIRD CO. 

Florence, Massachusetts 

Newspapers Magazines 
Rust Craft Cards 


I JWMB 

Grain - Lumber - Paints 
Building Materials 

Tel. Williamsburg 271 

and 

Chesterfield 2145 


Compliments 
of 

A Friend 



^<*v 






ll&vth&rn&im's ^z/qest cvnd ITfo&t i36axj.HJu/ K^umuhtAS^ 6t&*& 



\5 Bruise StA^b 



Tci. 4200 



X\ort\vxAY^pkorv 



Compliments of 

G. A. FINCK & SON 

Insurance Agency 



63 Main Street 



Florence, Mass. 



y^Lzaiant -Jims Jblioti 

Jewelers 

DIAMONDS - WATCHES • RINGS 

165 MAIN STREET 
N( >KTHAMPTON. MASSACHUSETTS 



mxxMR. Chest 



LINENS CURTAINS DOMESTICS 

177 Main Street 
Northampton. Mass. 






%Jl yAvjr'-tXjffv; ^Jewelry 5 We 

Diamonds mwM " ' M '* pm »» 

WATCHES JEWELRY 



WAT CM REPAIRING 



I W M.iin Street 



Florence. Md*Mcluieetl4 




i :;-v.\ , » -• 



$4uioiiw<Dlbilc 
"IR«PAininQ 

Oiscd (Cars 

<=> 

£. Jilt ins 

$>}$<>$ out e]u 

<=> 

JeL 428 




Cosmo Serio Re^Phar. 

Tel. 980 
65 STATE ST NORTHAMPTON 



BASILE ELECTRIC CO. 

King Street Northampton 

Sylvania T.V. - Zenith T.V. 

GE Refrigerators 

and 

Florence, Kelvinator and Bengal Ranges 



Compliments of 



SONTAG SUNOCO STATION 



SUNOCO GAS - OIL - TIRES and 
ACCESSORIES 



S>addacki 



Qy?7^c6 





South Main Street 



Williamsburg 



7 7fy. Oticm (ft Stfkffljot 



Jane A I den Products 

UNITED DAIRY 

23 Hooker Avenue 
Northampton 

cream — buttermilk — ice cream — butter 



Compliments of 

HAMPSHIRE LUMBER CO. 

33 Hawley Street 
Northampton Mass. 



Compliments of 

NORTHAMPTON SPORTING 
GOODS CO. 









161 Main St. 



Phone 715 



^LoRENCE §T0RE 

90/iflPLE Street 




15 



^att Street Xorthawp^ 



Compliments of 



IRaat&xa gCcd 



Haydenville, Mass. 




G- J. MORRISON 

Prescription Optician 

163 Main - Opposite McCallum's 



Congratulations and continual success in the 
future. This is the wish of the leading men's 
and boys' wearing apparel store in North- 
ampton. 



HARRY DANIELS 
ASSOCIATES 








ttxttTAor D«crator 

^ 3&I -418 

16 (krt5 (lit JUbrthomjjtoH Jtyft- 



e 



hf,4N 





Potato C hip €o|lC 

Norma Lee Canc|y 

y2Kmyfc. (Sorthampbrr 
Ttl 772 =^> 



X^ompUments cf 




t/xorthampton 
^/Massachusetts 






M.42 SO J 



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ZZoffitrg $6. QtoHl)0.-niptbn 



li. 



WOW (J (^ijMjM 



Compliments of 



E. M. RICE 

Native Lumber 



Tel. 548 
Williamsburg, Mass. 



For the young fellow who gradu- 
ates this year we have every- 
thing that he needs for this 
important occasion. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO. 
NORTHAMPTON 


UPLAND FARM 

On Village Hill 

Albert, Dorothy and Peter Crone 

Williamsburg 4831 


Compliments of 

PETE'S BARBER SHOP 


Compliments of 

EVAN'S SHOE REPAIR SHOP 


goto BRANDLE'S first 

To Save Time and Trouble for Your 
PRESCRIPTIONS 

Main Street Northampton 


Compliments of 

HERLIHY'S STORE 

76 Maple St. Florence 


U.S. SAVINGS BONDS and STAMPS 
WILLIAMSBURG POST OFFICE 



BERKSHIRE ETCHING CORPORATION 



Manufacturers of Nameplates 




Established 1925 



AQUADRO & CERRUTI, INC. 



General Contractors 

Complete Engineering and Building 

M. Aquadro, Pres., - R. A. Aquadro, V. Pres. 
0. J. Cerruti, Treas. 

Tel. 4096- W - Office and Yard - Rear of 
Grove St. 



R. E. CHAPMAN CO. 

Artesian and Gravel Packed Wkli.s 
Oakdale, Massachusetts 



TELEPHONE 

Amherst 02-w 



Edwin E. Woi.fe 



Compliments of 

PACKARD'S 
SODA SHOPPE 






■# * 



CJest Chesterfield 

===== Tel. 2.523 



Compliments of 



EVERON P. POLLEN 



Plumbing and Heating 



Compliments 
of 

PIONEER VALLEY GINGER ALE CO. 

& 
PEPSI-COLA BOTTLING CO. 

Main Street, Corner Chestnut 
Florence, Mass. 



E. S J. CIGAR COMPANY, INC. 



Northampton, Mass. 



Jewelers — Engravers 

Loving Cups — Trophies 

Watchmakers 



4 Pleasant St. 
Northampton 



Compliments of 



ELMBROOK FARM 



«r* 



CvnqvATVLATiQHb To n e QfUDU/irmq Gl4JT ol '?f 



Cqwe here f iwt utul 3nyf I iME and MoNt Y 



162 Main <5rftEET 



TCLo 11 



PAUL ARNO MANN 


Compliments of 


Technically good and artistic 




photography for over a quarter of 
a century. 


BROOK'S GARAGE 


53 Center St. Tel. 2068 


GOSHEN, MASS. 


Compliments of 


NOBLE MANUFACTURING 


COMPANY, INC. 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 




NORTHAMPTON AUTO PARTS 


MACDONALD'S SHOE SHOP 






SCRAP IRON and METALS 




USED AUTO PARTS 


185 Main Street Northampton 






S. R. Shermata King St. 





HAMPSHIRE MOTOR SALES 

P/fjAfi/n 280 North Kin 8" Street 

<3 ^ LINCOLN MERCURY 

^^^^ Northampton, Mass. Tel. 208 

mERCURY \J TEXACO SERVICE STATION 

72 King Street 




HAYDENVILLE SAVINGS BANK 

— Deposits are insured for the FULL AMOUNT under the laws 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

— Deposits draw interest from the fifteenth day of each month, 
the rate being 2/2 per cent. 

BANKING HOURS 

Monday through Friday — 9 A. M. to 3 P. M. 

Friday Evenings — 6 to 8 






Compliments of 

R. A. MacLEOD NURSERY 

LANDSCAPING AND TREE SERVICE 

Williamsburg 

Telephone 211 Old Goshen Road 



Compliments 0/ 

J. W. PARSONS & SON, Inc. 

REFRIGERATION SPRAYERS TRACTORS 

FARM MACHINES and SUPPLIES 

Tel. 2885 75 North King Street 

NORTHAMPTON 




CompUwenif of 




UorH Athlon 



Compliments of 



F. N. GRAVES & SONS, Inc. 



WILLIAMSBURG 



Compliments of 



BROWN'S MARKET 

Quality Meats, Groceries 
and Provisions 



218 State St. 



Northampton 



Broo-kside Dairg, Inc. 

JWrfk & CxEam 

19 Hawley Street, Northampton, Mass. 
Serving Williamsburg 



Compliments of 

Northampton's Newest and Smartest 
Mens wear Store 

CAHILL AND HODGES 



Northampton 



Compliments of 

The 
WILLIAMSBURG BLACKSMITHS 



Compliments of 

HILLSIDE ORCHARD 

Apples Peaches 
Maple Syrup 


COLONIAL CLEANERS 

Quality Cleaning — Dyeing 

Weekly Pickup - Delivery Service 

CARL SYLVESTER 

Tel. 247 
4 Main Street Williamsburg 


Compliments of 

R. F. BURKE 

Williamsburg, Massachusetts 


PLEASANT MARKET, INC. 

21 Main Street Northampton 


HERBS and ANNUALS 

CHOICE PERENNIALS 

For Rock Garden and Border 

HOUSE PLANTS 

VILLAGE HILL NURSERY 

Williamsburg, Massachusetts 


W. N. POTTER 
GRAIN STORES, Inc. 

WIRTHMORE FEEDS 
BUILDING SUPPLIES 

Northampton, Mass. Tel. 228 


Compliments of 

WILLIAMSBURG 
GENERAL STORE 

MEATS- GROCERIES- DRY GOODS 

GAS & ELECTRIC APPLIANCES 

SHOES- BOTTLED GAS 

Phone 294 Williamsburg 


NEWELL 'S FUNERAL HOME 

R. D. NEWELL & SON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Private Ambulance Service 

R. D. Newell, Jr. 

Tel. 2012 R 
Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 

JONES THE FLORIST 

Haydenville, Massachusetts 
Tel. 4331 - 4333 


Compliments 
of 

KING'S HOBBY SHOP 

24 Center Street 
Northampton, Mass. 


Compliments 
of 

NONOTUCK WOODWORKING 

Florence, Mass* 


Compliments of 

LINCOLN HOWES 

Representative 
Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 

Cummington, Mass. 


HECTOR A. AREL CO. 

GMC Trucks 
Sales & Service 

Northampton Tel. 2445 


Awnings 

Furniture Upholstering — Venetian Blinds 

Automobile Tops — Seat Covers 

Truck Covers 

Rusco Windows 

CHILSON'S SHOPS 

34 Center Street Northampton 
Phone 1822 


Congratulations to the Graduates 

FINES ARMY NAVY STORE 

37 Main Street Northampton 


Compliments of 

GEORGE L BARRUS & SONS 

General Farming 
Wood Lumber Maple Products 

Goshen, Mass. 
Tel. Williamsburg 3862 or 3866 




\3>8 PIEA5ANT ST. 




Plymouth 



Tel- 3092 

NOPT HAMPTON, \i ASS. 



Compliments of 



CARL'S APPAREL SHOP 



11 No. Maple St. 



Florence 



Compliments of 



CALLAHAN'S 5 & 10 STORE 



81 Main St. 



Florence 



BUSINESS EDUCATION ON A COLLEGE LEVEL 
Outstanding One-and Two-year Programs 

Executive Secretarial* Accounting 

Secretarial* Business Administration 

Stenographic Finishing* Junior Accounting 

Specialized secretarial subjects may be elected. 

Well-balanced Guidance and Placement Service 
Write for latest catalog 

Our 58th Fall Term Commences September 10, 1953 

NORTHAMPTON COMMERCIAL COLLEGE 

"The School of Thoroughness" 



Haskell & Gilbert 

247 Main Street Tel. 672 

Northampton, Mass. 

A complete line of school supplies 
Portable typewriters for sale & rent 



Compliments of 



W. E. KELLOGG & SON 



DAIRY and POULTRY PRODUCTS 



Tel. 3631 



Williamsburg 




m 








Best Wishes To 


Compliments of 


CLASS OF '53 


GUSETTI'S 


Williamsburg Fuel & Ice 




Co. 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


THE LUNCH BOX 


TILEY'S SERVICE STATION 


Compliments of 


HAYDENVILLE BUTTON COMPANY 


PIERCE'S STORE 


Incorporated 




Manufacturers of 
Pearl Buttons and Novelties 


Goshen, Massachusetts 


Haydenville, Mass. 


HELEN WOODS 




Lamps and Lampshades 
Original copyright designs 


HENRY H. SNYDER INC 

Worth ington 




Worthington 2121 Cummington 2574 


160 Main Street Northampton, Mass. 





E. C. ADDIS & CO. 

PLUMBING - HEATING 
Electrical Supplies — Pittsburg Paints 
Hardware and Varnishes 

Tel. 3099W 
42-46 Maple Street Florence, Mass. 



All Kinds of 
ROUGH and FINISHED LUMBER 
LATHE DOWELS BANDSAWING 

PACKARD BROTHERS 



Goshen 



Tel. Williamsburg 3404 



Compliments of 



SINCAGE PRINTING 



LAUNDRY CENTER 



35 State St. 
Northampton, Massachusetts 

Tel. 329 



HAMPSHIRE SALES & SERVICE 
CO. 

Frigidaire and Delco Products 



202 State Street 

Northampton Massachusetts 

Telephone 505-W 



Holiday Centerpieces 
Santa's Sleigh and Reindeer a Specialty 

also 
Wall and Mantel Plaques 



Order Early 



Chesterfiels 2121 







llapfias 


«^£fig 


TELECTRIC SHOP! 


A 28 CENTER ST. PHONE 1307 

Nl champton, Mass. 

Complete Electric Kitchens 

Oil Burners — Ranges — Refrigerators 

Wiring Service Since 1900 


r GoSMEM 


Compliments of 

BEAVER BROOK 
POULTRY FARM 

LEEDS, MASS. 


Compliments of 

THE BEE HIVE STORE 

SHOES - CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS 

29 Main Street Northampton 


Compliments of 

REARDON BROS. 

HAYDENVILLE 


XCuckAvtUAtjt/ 


NUTTING'S SHELL STATION 

Tel. 3341 
176 King St. Northampton, Mass. 


NORTHAMPTON 
FROZEN FOOD LOCKER 

"We honey cure and 
hickory smoke" 
Hawley Street — Northampton, Mass. 


Compliments of 

"MARIE'S GOSHEN INN" 


BEA'S LUNCH 

Breakfast — Lunches 

Special Dinners 

Williamsburg 4455 


WALSH SUPPLY COMPANY, INC 

Fuel —Masons' Supplies 

Builders' Supplies — Fertilizers 

Tel. Northampton 1586 

Florence Massachusetts 


O'BRIEN'S DRUG STORE 

24 Main Street 
Northampton, Massachusetts 


AL CHABOT 

Friendly So cony Service 

99 Pleasant St. Northampton 

Tel. 1104 


Compliments of 

THE HARLOW LUGGAGE 
STORE 

18 Center Street 
Northampton Mass. 


M. B. CICHY 

Modern Plumbing and Heating 

Supplies and Fixtures 

11 Market Street 

Northampton Mass. 


KAMINS' INTERIORS 

Interior Decoration — Paints 
Wallpapers 


C. H. STAAB'S FILLING STATION 

Gas and Motor Oil 

Tel, 2139 
150 Conz Street 

Northampton Mass. 


Compliments of 

GRIFE'S 
DEPARTMENT STORE 


SILAS SNOW 

Real Estate — Mortgage Loans 






-^SSMgm'St i^r 4 




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